Ge, Yichang-The Use of Narrative Justice to Facilitate Moral Knowledge Acquisition of the Human Right to Clean Drinking Water (Dr. Nancy Doubleday)

The Use of Narrative Justice to Facilitate Moral Knowledge Acquisition of the Human Right to Clean Drinking Water

This paper examines Indigenous water rights in Canada and investigates narrative justice,  a novel approach towards understanding empathetic policy and allyship. Prior to reviewing the concept of narrative justice,  the paper highlights key points in Indigenous history pertinent to the silencing and mistreatment of the people. Along with narrative justice,  the paper highlights examples from environmental justice to support the literature review. The purpose of this literature review is to connect the emergence of narrative justice as an investigative modality to understanding Indigenous water rights. This paper communicates the need for proper representation of Indigenous peoples in storytelling and research. In addition to narrative justice,  the paper highlights the growing gap between Indigenous peoples and the surrounding urban areas. This gap is described using the context of post-truth and how advancements in technology have contributed to a prevailing barrier between Western society and Indigenous communities. In this process,  the paper also draws on cases like the Nestle/Kinder Morgan controversy,  and other water-taking enterprises to show how Western/non-Indigenous needs are often prioritized. The framework of the paper is written from an ally perspective,  in hopes of helping to establish another form of methodology in this field of social justice. This paper aims to contribute towards the growing investigative modalities for narrative water and Indigenous justice. In exploring narrative justice in relation to Indigenous water rights in Canada,  this paper offers a fresh approach to social justice and hopes to help facilitate understanding of empathetic policy formation.