Frye in Our Colleges and Universities Today (2010)


Posted by Bob Denham on June 30th, 2010

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The critical canon, like the literary one, naturally changes over time.  The anthology of criticism I used as a student in the 1960s––The Great Critics, ed. Smith and Parks (3rd ed., 1951)––included a number of critics very seldom read nowadays (e.g., Henry Timrod).  The first edition of this anthology (1932) included Marco Girolamo Vida; the second edition (1939), Antonia Sebastian Minturno.  The fact that critics come and go is a commonplace observation.  Henry Hazlitt’s The Anatomy of Criticism, widely read in the 1930s, has more or less disappeared.  Frye’s Anatomy of Criticism has had a much better fate, but the question is frequently raised about Frye’s status today.  Has he, like Henry Timrod, disappeared into the dustbin of history?  “Who now reads Frye?” asks Terry Eagleton, rhetorically.

In an entry in this blog some time back (26 September 2009) Jonathan Allan reported on the contempt for Frye he heard at a Canadian Studies Conference.  Allan, however, goes on to surmise that “Frye, in most instances, is now covered in survey courses of literary theory.”  I suspect this is the case, though descriptions of such courses are often so brief and lacking in specificity that without a syllabus at hand it is impossible to know what’s on the reading list.  Still, there are indications that Frye is still being read.  His Fearful Symmetry was among the most frequently borrowed books from the English Faculty Library at Oxford during the Trinity Term 2009 and the Hilary Term 2010, and if we survey what is available on the web, we discover that Frye has not at all disappeared from college and university course descriptions and syllabi.  The list that follows records the results of such a survey.  My guess is that it represents only a fraction of those courses in which Frye is required or recommended reading or is otherwise the focus of an entire course or of a course unit.  (I quit searching after I had recorded 400 entries.)  There are doubtless a number of course in twentieth‑century literary criticism, Shakespeare, Blake, Canadian literature, and other subjects where Frye is read, but, again, this information is not always available in the catalogue course descriptions that are available on the web.

The list represents courses offered during the past ten or so years.  (A few entries are for high school courses and M.A. exam reading lists).  In most instances the entries provide the course title, name of the instructor, the year offered, and a brief account of the “Frye content.”  The list is extraordinarily fluid: instructors come and go, courses and added and dropped, catalogue listing changes from one year to the next, and web sites go dead, and URLs are broken.  Still, the list reminds us of the widespread attention Frye continued to receive during the past decade, and so it serves as an answer, at least in part, to Eagleton’s rhetorical question, “Who now reads Frye?”

Bloggers are invited to send me additions to the list (denham@roanoke.edu).

Courses in Which Frye Appears on the Syllabus

Aberystwyth University.  English 3792.  “The Nature of Literature: Experiments in Ecocriticism.”  Matthew R. Jarvis.  2005.  Unit on “Seasons and Myths” requires reading selections from Anatomy of Criticism.

Adelphi University.  English 0122-454-001 and 0122-634-001.  “Special Topics in Changing Forms: Methods of Literary Analysis.”  Unit on “Form, Structures, and Signs” includes readings from Frye.

Arizona State University.  Linguistics 516: “Pragmatics and Discourse Theory.”  Don L.F. Nilsen.  2006.  Study of discourse models, including Frye’s on genres and archetypes

Arkansas State University.  English 1643.  “The Impulse toward Religion.”  Wayne Narey.  2007.  Readings from Myth and Metaphor for unit entitled “From Mythology to Religion to Literature.”

Atholton High School, Columbia, Missouri.  English 10H.  “Literary Archetypes.”  Colleen Miller.  2009–2010.  Course organized on basis of Frye’s idea of archetypes.

Atlantic Baptist University (renamed Crandall University in 2009).  English 4843.  “Northrop Frye.”  Douglas Mantz.  2010.   An intensive study of Frye’s literary theory and criticism.

Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan, Punjab, Pakistan.  Syllabus for M.A. in English.  2009–2011.  Includes Anatomy of Criticism for unit on criticism.

Ball State University.  Communications, TCOM 601.  “Foundations of Digital Storytelling 1.”  James W. Chesebro.  Unit on “Defining Narrative” requires reading Anatomy of Criticism, Theory of Modes.

Bard College.  “Literary Theory and Criticism.”  Raphael Allison.  2006.  Reading of “The Archetypes of Literature.”

Bar‑Ilan University, Israel.  English 37-314-1.  “Shakespeare.”  M. Roston.  Reading list includes Anatomy of Criticism.

Bharathiar University, Coimbatore, India.  M.A. in English Literature.  “Literary Theory and Criticism.” 2007–2008.  Includes “The Archetypes of Literature.”

Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli, India.  Centre for Canadian Studies.   The main focus of the Centre’s research is on Fiction, Criticism, and Poetry. The featured prominent writers include Frye.

Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli, India.  M.A. in English.  Centre for Distance Education.  2006.  Readings for unit on “Literary Criticism” include “The Archetypes of Literature.”

Bharati Vidyapeeth Deemed University, Pune, India.  Unit on Contemporary Critical Theories has required reading of “The Archetypes of Literature.”

Bismarck High School, Bismark, ND.  Advanced Placement English 12.  “Literature and Composition.”  Brenda Werner.  Reading of W.T. Jewkes and Frye, eds. The Ways of the World: Satire and Irony.

Boston College.  English 821.  “Medieval English Romance.”  Robert Stanton.  2008.  Required reading:  The Secular Scripture.

Brandeis University.  UWS 77a: “University Writing Seminar.”  Diana Renn.  2000.  Reading: “The Motive for Metaphor” from The Educated Imagination.

Brigham Young University.  English 452.  “Literary Theory and Criticism 2.”  Kerry Muhlestein.  2001.  Reading of Frye, among other theorists.

Brock University.  Political Science.  3P05.  “Canadian Political Thought.”  Selected works of Frye, among others.

Brooklyn College, City University of New York.  English 700. 1X.2SX.  “Literary Texts and Critical Methods.”  Jeff Drouin.  2006.  Unit on “Liberal Humanism/New Criticism” includes reading of “The Function of Criticism at the Present Time.”

Bryn Mawr University.  English B209.  “Literary Kinds.”  Anne Dalke.  2010.  Readings by Frye on genre theory.

Bucknell University.  English 340.  “Early Irish Myths and Legends.”  Alf Siewers.  Reading of an unidentified Frye essay.

California State University, Bakersfield.  English 570.  “Literary Criticism.”  Steven Frye.  2006.  Required reading: “The Archetypes of Literature.”

California State University, Dominguez Hills.  Humanities 310–02.  “Key Concepts: Hero and Antihero.”  Tom Giannotti.  2007.  Unidentified class handout on Aristotle and Frye.

California State University, Dominguez Hills.  Humanities 573.  “Key Periods and Movements in Literature: Archetypal Criticism: Theory and Practice.”  Lyle E. Smith.  Reading: Anatomy of Criticism.

California State University, Northridge.  RS 310.  “Religion and Literature: William Blake and the Visionary Recital.”   Amir Hussain and Crerar Douglas.  2002.  One of the goals of the course is “to gain an appreciation of the scholarship of Blake scholars such as Northrop Frye.”

California State University, Sacramento.  English 200A.  “Methods and Materials.”  David W. Madden.  2009.  In a unit on “Intertextual Criticism,” reading of The Critical Path.

California State University, San Bernardino.  English 600. “Critical Approaches to Literature.”  Chad Luck.  2010.  Reading of “The Archetypes of Literature.”

California State University, San Luis Obispo.  English 510.  “Shakespeare and the Bible.”  Steven Marx.  1999.  For the unit on The Tempest, readings from Northrop Frye on Shakespeare.

Carleton University.  Political Science 3109.  “The Politics of Law and Morality.”  Radha Jhappan.  2006.  Reading of “Canada: New World without Revolution.”

Centenary College of Louisiana.  English 478S.  “Literary and Cultural Theory from Plato to the Present.”  Jefferson Hendricks.  2004.  Unit 6 on “Psychoanalytic Theory” includes reading of “The Archetypes of Literature.”

Central Board of Secondary Education, New Delhi, India.  Syllabi for Pre.PhD/Pre M.Phil/Pre MS.  “Research Methodology and Literary Criticism.”  2006.  Recommended reading for unit on “Approaches to Criticism”: Anatomy of Criticism.

Central European University, Budapest.  History 5030. “Bookish Traditions: Authority and the Book in Scripturalist Religions.” Aziz Al Azmeh and Nadia Al Bagdadi.  2006–2007.  Mandatory general readings include chapter 5 of The Great Code.

Central Michigan University.  Mass Communications.  BCA 503.  “Critiquing Mass Media.”  Anatomy of Criticism on reading list.

Chapman University.  “English 456.  “Criticism and Theory.”  Alfred J. Drake.  2002.  Reading:  “The Function of Criticism at the Present Time.”

Chinese University of Hong Kong.  CRS3022.  “Myth, Fantasy and Culture.”  Wong Wai Ching.  2010.  Unit on “Sexuality in Myths: Genesis II – III (Hebrew Myth)” requires reading “Images of Paradise: Trees and Water,” and “Parody and Manifest Demonic: Trees and Water,” in Biblical and Classical Myths: The Mythological Framework of Western Culture.

 

Chinese University of Hong Kong.  English 3210.  “Literature and Religion.”  2009–2010.  Required text: The Great Code.

Claremont McKenna College.  Literature 61.  “The Bible.”  Robert Faggen.  2004.  Readings of criticism on the Bible by Frye and others.

Clemson University.  English 310.  “Writing Critically about Literature.”  Elisa Kay Sparks.  2005.  Readings from Anatomy of Criticism.

Clemson University.  English 450.  “Science Fiction Film.”  Elisa Kay Sparks.  2006.  In unit on the hero’s journey, reading from Frye on romance from Anatomy of Criticism.

Clemson University.  English 436/635.  “Literary Criticism.”  Elisa Kay Sparks.  Reading of Anatomy of Criticism (Theory of Modes” and “Mythos of Romance” and Frye’s introduction to The Tempest.

Colby College.  Performing Arts 397f.  “Comedy and Revolution.”  Joylynn Wing.  2000.  Readings in Frye’s Theory of Comedy.”

College of the Holy Cross.  English 374.  “The Bible and Literature.”  Robert Cording.  2010.  “Course takes its title from Northrop Frye’s book, ‘The Great Code.’  Studies what Frye calls the ‘mythological universe’ of the Bible that stretches from creation to the end of the world, looking particularly at the narrative structures of the Bible and its recurrent patterns of imagery.

Columbia University.  Philosophy W3852.  “Philosophy of Literature.”  David Sidorsky.  2009.  Selections from  Anatomy of Criticism.

Columbia University.  Philosophy G4038.  “Concepts of Criticism: Philosophy and Literary Theory.” David Sidorsky.  2006.  Unit on “Literary Modernism: The Domain of Literature and the Anatomy of Criticism” devoted to Fr6ye’s Anatomy.

Columbia University.  English and Comparative Literature.  CLEN G6801.  “The Theory of the Novel.”  Nicholas Dames.  2003.  Suggested readings include Anatomy of Criticism.

Columbia University.  English W3840y.  “Studies in Poetry: Satire.”  Paul Violi.  2007.  One of the texts for the course: Anatomy of Criticism.

Columbia University.  English  G5006.  “Introduction to the Discipline.”  David Damrosch.  One of the readings for session 6, “The Theory Boom,” is the “Polemical Introduction” to Anatomy of Criticism.

 

Columbia University.  English G5001.  “The Critic in Culture.”  David Damrosch.  2005.  Unit on poetics requires readings from Anatomy of Criticism.

Columbia University.  English and Comparative Literature.  English 5001, sect. 2.  “Introduction to Literary Scholarship.”  Ezra Tawil.  2009.  Unit on genre begins with reading of Frye,

Columbia University.  Comparative Literature and English.  CLEN W3973x.  “Tragicomic Transformations: Genre Mixtures in English Renaissance Drama.”  Maiken Derno.   Among suggested readings for unit on “Taxonomy and Transformations” is Anatomy of Criticism.

Concordia University, Sir George Williams Campus.  English 661A/2 AA.  “Cosmopolitanism, Transnationalism, and Double Identities in Modern and Contemporary Canadian Fiction.”  Daniel O’Leary.  2008.  Considers Canadian literature in the context of Frye’s thought and that of others.

Concordia University, Sir George Williams Campus.  English377/2.  “Contemporary Canadian Fiction.”  Peter Webb.  2009.  Reading list includes The Bush Garden.

Cornell University.  English 6792.  “Theory of the Lyric.”  Jonathan Culler.  2009.  Readings on Frye’s view of the lyric.

Cornell University.  Classics.  Greek 4116.  “The Poetics of Greek Prose.”  Jeffrey Rusten.  Spring 2010.  Recommended for unit on “Stylistic Criticism”:  The Well‑Tempered Critic.

Creighton University.  English 600: “ Introduction to Graduate Study.”  Fidel Fajardo-Acosta.”  1999.  Frye included in the linguistic phase of literary criticism.

Dallas Baptist University.  Philosophy 4304.  “Aesthetics and Creativity.”  David Naugle.  2004.  Included on reading list for “Mostly Christian Perspective on Art, Aesthetics and Poetics” are The Educated Imagination, Anatomy of Criticism, and The Great Code.

Dartmouth College.  English 14.  “Introduction to Criticism.”  Jonathan Crewe.  2010.  Selections from the work of Frye.

Denmark’s School of Education at the University of Aarhus.  “Modern Literary Theory and Criticism.”  2007.  Reading of “The Archetypes of Literature” in unit on Archetypal and Myth Criticism.

Davidson College .  English 391.  “Literary Criticism.”  Zoran Kuzmanovich.  Offered alternate years.  Readings include  “Archetypes of Literature.”

Dickinson College.  English 350.  “Medieval Romance.”  Thomas Reed.  2005.  Readings: selections from Anatomy of Criticism (“Fictional Modes: Introduction” & “The Mythos of Summer: Romance”).

Duke University.  English 235S.  “Enlightenment Orientalism.”  S. Aravamudan, 2010. Readings from Georg Lukàcs, Ian Watt, Mikhail Bakhtin, Northrop Frye, et al.

Eastern Connecticut State University.  English 461: Senior Seminar.  “Studies in Dramatic Comedy.”   Miriam Chirico.  2007.  Includes a study of Frye’s theory of comedy.

Emory University.  Comparative Literature 751R.  “Theories of Myth in the 20th and 21st Centuries.”  Laurie Patton.  2009.  Examines the writings of Frye, among others.

Eötvös Loránd University, School of English and American Studies, Budapest.  AN 312.21.  “The Bible and Literature: Northrop Frye’s Theory.”  János Kenyeres.  2003.  Texts: The Great Code: The Bible and Literature; Myth and Metaphor: Selected Essays 1974–1988; David Cayley, ed. Northrop Frye in Conversation.

 

Eötvös Loránd University, School of English and American Studies, Budapest.  IR-ANMO 213.   “Metaphor, Symbol and Allegory in Northrop Frye’s Literary Theory.”  János Kenyeres.  2004.  Among course readings are Fearful Symmetry, Anatomy of Criticism, and The Great Code.

Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary.  Faculty of Humanities.  “Culture and Tradition from the Perspective of Northrop Frye and Marshall McLuhan.”  János Kenyeres.  2010–2011.

Eötvös Loránd University, School of English and American Studies, Budapest.  IR-ANMO 220.  “The Classics of American Literary Theory: Close Reading of Major Texts.”  Péter Dávidházi.  2004.  Reading list includes unspecified works by Frye.

Eötvös Loránd University, School of English and American Studies, Budapest.  “American Literary Theory: A Survey.”  Enikő Bollobás.  2004.  Reading for unit on “Psychoanalytic, Myth, and Archetypal Criticism” includes “The Archetypes of Literature.”

Florida International University, Honors College.  Religion 5023.  “Myth and Religion.”  Lesley A. Northrop.  2009.  In the unit on Theories and Theorists, Frye is one of a number of synthesizers of myth whose work is examined.

Fordham University.  English 5845.  “Early American Novel.”  Ed Cahill.  2010.  Readings from classic theories of the novel, including Frye’s.

Fordham University.  English 6233. Romance and Reform: Crossing Boundaries Medieval to Early Modern.”  Katherine Clover Little.  2005.  Includes study of Frye’s theory of romance.

Fort Hays State University.  English 826.  “Approaches to Literature.”  Require reading: “The Function of Criticism at the Present Time.”

The Forum Philosophical School of Athens.  LY06.  “Theory and Criticism of Literature.”  William Schultz.  2009–2010.  Readings: “Literature as Context: Milton’s Lycidas” and “The Archetypes of Literature.”

Franklin and Marshall University.  Theatre, Dance, Film/Art 363.  “Film Theory: Comedy.”  Dirk Eitzen.  2009.  Required readings:  “Comic Fictional Modes” and “The Mythos of Spring: Comedy” from

Anatomy of Criticism.

Fuller School of Theology.  NS582.  “Biblical Narrative: Issues and Approaches.”  Bruce N. Fisk.  Required reading: The Great Code.

George Mason University.  Honors 353.  “Videogames in Critical Contexts.”  Mark Sample.  2009.  Readings:  “Archetypes of Literature.”

Georgia College and State University.  English 491.  “Practicing the Theories.”  Alex E. Blazer.  2004.  Readings by Frye on the comic vision from “The Archetypes of Literature.”

Georgia State College and University.  English 4110.  “Literary Criticism.”  Alex E. Blazer.  2009.  Required reading: he Archetypes of Literature.”

Georgia State University.  Communications 8750.  “Issues in Style and Narrative: Narrative, Myth and Ideology.”  Ted Friedman.  2004.  Readings include Anatomy of Criticism.

Graduate Center, City University of New York.  English 80600.  “Biblical Narratology.”  David Richter.  2007.  “Our chief whipping boys will be Harold Bloom and Northrop Frye.”

Grinnell College.  Theatre 303.01.  “Studies in Drama I: Shakespeare’s Comedies and Tragedies.”  Ellen Mease.  2008.  Readings include A Natural Perspective.

Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin City, China.  Institute for the Study of Canada/L’Institut d’etudes canadiennes.  One of the main orientations of the institute is Frye studies.

Harvard University.  English 193.  “An Introduction to 20th-Century Literary Theory.”  Leland P. de la Durantaye.  2010.  Readings of works by Frye.

Haverford College.  English 241b.  “Inventing the Novel.”  Laura McGrane. 2007.  Draws on contemporary theorists of the novel, including Frye.

Haverford College.  English 212b.  “The Bible and Literature.”  Stephen Findley.  2008.  Readings from The Great Code.

Haverford College.  English 352a.  “Romanticism and Theory.”  Stephen Findley.  2003.  Readings from Fearful Symmetry.

Hobart and William Smith Colleges.  English 399.  “American Tale.”  2010.  Uses Frye’s distinction between the short realistic form he calls “story” and the short romance form he calls “tale” to illuminate readings of selected short fictions.

Hong Kong University of Science and Technology.  Humanities 601Q.  “Lyricism in Literature and the Arts.”  Lisa L.M. Wong.  2010.  Reading from “The Rhythm of Association: The Lyric,” Fourth Essay, Anatomy of Criticism.

Hope College.  English 480 01.  “Introduction to Literary Theory.”  William A. Pannapacker.  2005. Reading of “The Archetypes of Literature.”

Humboldt State University.  English 120.  “Introduction to the English Major.”  Michael Eldridge.  Readings include “Literature as Context: Milton’s Lycidas.”

Husson University.  English 303.  “Canadian Literature.”  Adam Crowley.  2009.  Reading in  The Bush Garden.

Indiana University of Pennsylvania.  English 983.  “Seminar in American Literature: Satire and Satire Theory in Early America.”  Todd Thompson.  2010.  Includes Frye’s theory of satire.

Indira Gandhi National Open University, New Delhi, India.  School of Humanities.  Master’s Degree in English 12.  “A Survey Course in 20th Century Canadian Literature.”  2007.  Exam question on Frye’s contribution to Canadian criticism.

Inner Mongolia University, Hoh–hot, China.  Canadian Studies Centre/Centre d’etudes canadiennes.  “Main orientation: languages and literature in Canada; Northrop Frye as a cultural & literary critic . . . .”

International School of Aruba.  English.  “Advanced Placement: English Language and Composition.”  Unit 7, “Critical Essays,” includes Anatomy of Criticism.

Jadavpur University.  Comparative Literature.  CL/PG/3.3c.  “Canadian Literature: Course I.”  Readings from The Bush Garden.

Jamal Mohamed College, Tamil Nedu, India.  Syllabus for M.A. in English.  2005.  Unit on “Literary Criticism, Archetypal” includes “The Archetypes of Literature.”

Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi. India.  Department of English and Modern European Languages.  2011.  Unit 5 of M.A. syllabus for “Criticism II” includes reading of “The Archetypes of Literature.”

Károli University, Budapest, Hungary.  Department of Hermeneutics.  “The Imagination, the Word and the Soul: The Main Stages in the Life and Work of Northrop Frye.”  Sára Tóth.  2010.  Tibor Fabiny lectures on Frye in this course.

Karunya University, India.  English 304.  “Literary Criticism.”  2009.  Reading list for unit III includes “The Archetypes of Literature.”

Kasetkart University, Bangkok, Thailand.  Department of Literature 373 422.  “Shakespeare’s Plays.”  2009.  Reading list includes Northrop Frye on Shakespeare.

Kennesaw State University.  English 3320.  “Scriptural Literature: The Bible as Literature.”  L. Dabundo.  2009.  Among recommended readings: The Great Code.

Killingly High School, Danielson, CT.  “Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition.”  Ernest Dodge.  2009.  Unit on Romantic period requires a paper based on “Blake’s Treatment of the Archetype” among other choices of collateral reading.

Kutztown University.  SPE/MUS 217.  “The Music of Poetry.”  Reading list includes Anatomy of Criticism.

Lake Oswego High School, Lake Oswego, Oregon.  “Senior English.”   Jason Parris.  2009–2010.  “The senior curriculum is designed according to a philosophical and critical framework laid out in Northrop Frye’s “Theory of Myth.” In addition to reading his theory, we will be moving (roughly) through the seasons with Frye’s corresponding genres: romance, tragedy, satire, and comedy.”

Lake Superior State University.  English 450.  “Directed Independent Study in Literary Criticism.”  Lance Rivers.  2004.  Frye included in unit on “Classic Texts.”

Longwood University.  English 365.  “Shakespeare.”  Shawn Smith.  2008.  One of the “course documents” is Frye on the “Green World” in Shakespeare’s comedies

Louisiana Tech University.  English 480.  “Science Fiction.”  Robert W Rudnicki.  2009.  Reading includes “The Archetypes of Literature.”

Lovely Professional University, Phagwara, India.   English 526.  “Critical Approaches and Literary Theories.”  Unit on “Archetypal or Myth Criticism” devoted to Jung, Bodkin, and Frye.

Loyola College, Chennai, India.  EL 4500.  “Australian and Canadian Literatures.”  2004.  Selections from Divisions on a Ground.

McGill University.  English 431.  “Studies in Drama:  Canadian Shakespeares.”  Leanore Lieblein.  2005.  Attends to Frye’s role in the creation of one of the Canadian Shakespeares.

McMaster University.  English 798.  “Language and Metaphor.”  Jeffery Donaldson.  2007.  Reading: Words with Power.

McMaster University.  Comparative Literature.  3BB3.  “Northrop Frye and Genre.”  2006.

Maharshi Dayanand University, Rohtak, India.  “Research Methodology and Approaches to Literature.”  2009.  This unit of the M. Phil. exam, as well as the unit on “Theory of Drama,” requires reading Anatomy of Criticism.

Mahatma Gandhi Kashi Vidyapeeth, Varanasi, India.  English.  Recommended reading for M.A. paper on Shakespeare includes Fools of Time.

Mahatma Gandhi Kashi Vidyapeeth, Varanasi, India.  “English Literature of the 20th Century: Literary Criticism.”  Reading of “The Archetypes of Literature.”  Recommended reading: Northrop Frye in Modern Criticism, ed. Murray Krieger and Robert D. Denham, Northrop Frye and Critical Method.

Marriotts Ridge High School, Marriottsville, MD.  English 10.  Jennifer Skahill.  2010.  “The English 10 curriculum is based on Northrop Frye’s concept of literary archetypes.”

Massachusetts Institute of Technology.  CMS 851.  “Feeling and Imagination in Art, Science, and Technology.”  Irving Singer and Hugo Liu.  2006.  Unit on “Affective Dimensions of Myth” includes readings from Anatomy of Criticism.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology.  Literature/21l-422.  “Tragedy.”  2002.  Alvin Kibel.  Readings from Anatomy of Criticism.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology.  21L.435/MS.840.  “Shakespeare, Film and Media.”  Peter S. Donaldson.  2002.  Readings from Anatomy of Criticism.

Memorial University of Newfoundland, Sir Wilfred Grenfell College.  English 4105.  “Critical Approaches and Theory.”  Readings include Frye.

Miami University, Ohio.  English 640.  “Romantic vs. Sentimental Poetics in 18th- and 19th-Century Britain.”  Laura Mandell.  2002.  Reading includes Frye on Romanticism.

Mid Sweden University (Mittuniversitetet).  B.A. in Comparative Literature.  2008.  Syllabus reading includes “The Argument of Comedy” and “Introduction to The Tempest.”

Millsaps College.  Religious Studies 3900/4900.  “Religious Studies Seminar: What Is Scripture?” Steven G. Smith.  2004.  The Great Code included on the reading list.

Minnesota State University.  English 441.  “Literary Theory and Criticism.”   Suzanne Bunkers.  2007.  Unit on “Psychoanalytic Theory” deals with key concepts from Anatomy of Criticism.

Monash University.  RLM4090.  “The Authority of the Text: The Hermeneutical Question.”  Peter Howard and Kevin Hart.  Recommended text: The Great Code.

Moscow State University.  Faculty of Foreign Languages and Area Studies.  “Timeless Stories and Images of Culture: Mythology––The Bible––Literature.”  Elena I. Volkova.  Readings from The Great Code in this course devoted to typological and mythological approaches to the Bible.

Mount Mary College.  English.  “Introduction to Modern Literary Theory.”  Kristi Siegel. 2006.  Unit on archetypal criticism includes Frye.

Nagarjuna University, Nagar, India.  English.  “The Western Theory (Beyond New Criticism).”  2003.  Frye’s “The Archetypes of Literature.”

Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing, China.  Canadian Studies Centre.”  Course in “Twentieth‑Century Literary Theory” includes Frye.

National University of Ireland, Maynooth.  English 152.  “Studies in Literary Form.”  2010.  Unit on “Critical Approaches to Literature” requires reading of Frye on mythic archetypes.

National University of Singapore.  English 2215.  “Science Fiction and Fantasy.”  Rajeev Patke.  2000.  Unit on Lord of the Rings examines the narrative in term of Frye’s theory of modes.

National University of Singapore.  English 5220.  “Genres in Popular Culture: Fantasy and Speculative Fiction.”  Robbie Goh.  2003–2004.  Reading from “Theory of Myths” of Anatomy of Criticism.

New Jersey Institute of Technology.  English 604.  “Communication Theory and Research.”  Norbert Elliot.  Date uncertain but after 2005.  Required reading for unit on “Structuralism”: Anatomy of Criticism.

New York University.  Department of Media, Culture, and Communication.  E38.2088.001.  “Game Studies (Languages of Communication: Electronic Media).”  Alexander R. Galloway.  2005.   Readings from Anatomy of Criticism.

New York University.  “The Uses of the Novel: First Year Research Seminar.”  Karen Homick. 2010.  Week 2, reading from Anatomy of Criticism, “Theory of Genres: Specific Continuous Forms (Prose Fiction).”

New York University.  Comparative Literature G29.2300.02.  “Time Signatures: The Politics of Periodization in Literary History and the Impossibility of Historical Epic.” Emily Apter.  2009.  Reading of Anatomy of Criticism (“Historical Criticism: Theory of Modes”).

New York University.  Writing K30.1015.  “The Practice of Writing: The Poetics of Expression.”  Scott Hightower.  2007.  Recommended reading:  Anatomy of Criticism.

North Carolina State University.  English 209.  “Plays of Shakespeare.”  William P. Shaw.  2010.  Units on The Merchant of Venice and The Tempest include readings from A Natural Perspective.

North Eastern Hill University, Shillong, India.  English C 113.  “Literary Theory and Criticism.”  Reading of “Myth, Fiction, and Displacement.”

North Eastern Hill University, Shillong, India.  English C 101.  “Poetry.”  Reading of Frye’s The Return of Eden.

North Eastern Hill University, Shillong, India.  English C 106.  “Poetry II.”  Reading of Fearful Symmetry.

Northampton High School, Northampton, MA.  “AP English Language and Composition.  Susan Crago.  2008.  In unit on Memory, Imagination, and Expression, reading of “The Motive for Metaphor” from The Educated Imagination.

Oberlin College.  English 372.  “Contemporary Literary Theory: Post-Modernity & Imagination.”  Pat Day.  2008.  Reading of Frye’s “Polemical Introduction” to Anatomy of Criticism.

Oberlin College.  English 342.  “Comedy and Postmodernism.”  Mike Reynolds.  2001.  Readings from Frye on modes and genres.

Oberlin College.  English/Comparative Literature 304.  “Shakespeare and the Forms of Tragedy.”  Robert Pierce.  2002.  Reading of A Natural Perspective.

Oberlin College.  English/Comparative Literature 304.  “Shakespeare Studies: Dramatic Geographies.”  Robert Pierce.  2001.  Reading of A Natural Perspective.

Old Dominion University and Moscow State University.  “Character Typology in Russian and U.S. Literature and Culture.”  Dana A. Heller (Old Dominion University), Elena I. Volkova (Moscow State University).  2007.  Supplementary reading includes Anatomy of Criticism.

Pennsylvania State University.  English 550.  “The Rhetoric and Poetics of Satire.”  Rob Hume.  2009.  Reading: Anatomy of Criticism.

Philosophical Faculty of Zagreb, Croatia.  “Zagorka, Cultural Studies and Feminism.”  Masa Grdešić.  2008.  Unit eight on romance includes readings from The Secular Scripture.

Philosophical Faculty of Zagreb, Croatia.  Comparative Literature.  “Jung and Archetypal Criticism.”  Zeljko Matijašević.  2009.  Includes unit on “Archetypal Criticism: Northrop Frye” and “Theory of Myths”

Princeton University.  Comparative Literature.  COM 301.  “Theory and Methods of Comparative Literature: Critical and Literary Theory.”  Claudia Brodsky.  2008.  Frye included on reading list.

Purdue University.  English 632.  “Seminar in Narrative Theory.”  D. F. Felluga.  2008.  Reading: Anatomy of Criticism, First Essay (Theory of Modes)

Purdue University.  English 596/EDCI 551.  “Young Adult Literature.”  Janet M. Alsup.  2010.  Required text: The Educated Imagination.

Purdue University.  EDCI 311.  “Media for Children.”  Charles Elster           and Laura Meyers.  2001.  Includes readings from The Educated Imagination.

Queen Mary, University of London.  Research Colloqium.  “Anglo-German Mythologies: Literature, Culture, Theory.”  Angus Nicholls.  2006.  Session 5 devoted to “Myth, Fiction and Displacement” from Fables of Identity.

Queen Mary, University of London.  European Literature, Culture and Thought.  SMLM 003.  “Comedies of Desire.”  2006.  Essential reading list includes Anatomy of Criticism.

Queen’s College, City University of New York.  English 636TW/636 E6M3.  “Literary Criticism.”  David Richter. 2003.  Reading of “The Archetypes of Literature.”

Queen’s College, City University of New York.  English 381.  “The Bible as/in Literature.”  David Richter.  2006.  Considers Frye’s archetypal mode of biblical interpretation.

Queen’s University (Canada).  English 386.  “Topics in Canadian Literature I.”  Carolyn Smart.  2011.  From the point of view of a professional creative writer, considers the debates about Canadian literature inspired by Frye and others.

Queen’s University (Canada).  English 386.  “Topics in Canadian Literature II.”  Tracy Ware.  2011.  Considers the debates about Canadian literature inspired by Frye and others.

Radford University.  English 621.  “Principles of Literary Criticism and Theory.”  Jolanta W. Wawrzycka. 2010.  Frye’s work taught as part of a unit on mythological criticism.

Radford University.  English 420.  “Introduction to Literary Criticism and Theory.”  Jolanta W. Wawrzycka.  2010.  In a unit on “Psychoanalytical and Myth/Archetype Approaches” considers Frye’s contribution to literary studies.

Rani Durgavati Vishwavidyalaya (formerly University of Jabalpur), Jabalpur, India. Syllabus for the M.A. in English.  Unit on Canadian Literature (Prose) requires reading Anatomy of Criticism.

Raritan Valley Community College.  English 202.  “Introduction to Literary Theory and Criticism.”  2004.  Unit on “Formalism, Humanism, and Literary Theory” examines “The Function of Criticism at the Present Time”

Reconstructionist Rabbinical College.  “Hebrew Bible and the Feminist Imagination.”

Lori Lefkovitz.  2004.  Reading of The Great Code.

Redeemer’s University, Nigeria.  Mass Communications 411.  “Critical Review and Writing.”  Required text: The Critical Path.

Reed College.  English 205.  “Introduction to Fiction: Genres of the Early Novel.”  Short critical readings on genre, realism, and the novel drawn from Auerbach, Bakhtin, Frye, and others.

Reed College.  English 333.  “Studies in Fiction:  The Romance.”   Frye’s view that romance is the structural core of all fiction is set over against the view that the romance is a historically specific genre, the medieval precursor to the modern novel.

Roanoke College.  English 308A.  “Northrop Frye.”  Robert D. Denham.  2004.  Reading of The Educated Imagination, Myth and Metaphor, The Double Vision, and Northrop Frye in Conversation.

Roma Tre University.  Foreign Languages and Literatures.  “Anglo‑Canadian Literature.”  Caterina Ricciardi.  1999.  Reading of Reflections on the Canadian Literary Imagination: A Selection of Essays by Northrop Frye, ed. Branko Gorjup.

Roma Tre University.  Foreign Languages and Literatures.  “English Literature II: Shakespeare.”  Maria del Sapio. 1999.  Reading of Italian translation of Northrop Frye on Shakespeare.

Royal Holloway, University of London.  English 3011.  “Shakespeare: The Problem Comedies.”  Roy Booth and Martin Dzelzainis.  Preliminary reading includes The Myth of Deliverance.

Royal Holloway, University of London.  English 1106.  “Shakespeare.”  General reading includes A Natural Perspective.

Royal Holloway, University of London.  English 3203.  “Satire to Sentiment 1690–1800.”  Judith Hawley.   Reading for unit on sentimentalism includes “Towards Defining an Age of Sensibility.”

Rutgers University.  “Literary Criticism and Theory.”  M.A.R. Habib.  2007.  Reading of “The Archetypes of Literature.”

Rutgers University.  “Introduction to Graduate Literary Study.”  M.A.R. Habib.  2002.  Reading: “The Archetypes of Literature”

Rutgers University.    English 350:393.  “Issues and Problems in Twentieth Century Literature and Culture: Canadian Literature in English.”  Course takes as one of its starting points Frye’s argument about the correlation between space and subjectivity.

Saint John’s College High School, Washington, DC.  “Honors British Literature.”  Raymond Nighan.  In the unit on the Classical Period, Frye on “what literature means.”

Saint Louis University High School.  Sophomore English.  2009–2010.  “Early in the year, students learn Frye’s definitions of comedy and irony and use these to interpret the characters and outcomes of short stories and poems.”

San Jose State University.  English 195.  “Senior Seminar in Literary Theories.”  Noelle Williams.  2010.  Unit on “Structuralism” includes “The Archetypes of Literature.”

Sapienza University of Rome.  Linguistic and Literature Studies, Russian Literature [sic].  “The Bible and Literature: The Great Code of Western Literature.”  Rita Giuliani.  2007–2008.  Reading of The Great Code.

Sapienza University of Rome.  “English Literature: Reinterpretation of Macbeth.”  Rosa Maria Colombo. 2009.  Course based on reading of Macbeth by Agostino Lombardo.  Readings include Frye’s Shakespearean criticism.

School of the Art Institute of Chicago.  “Masterworks: William Blake.”  Peter O’Leary.  2010.  Required text:  Fearful Symmetry.

 

Seton Hill University, Greensburg, PA.  English 312.  “Literary Criticism.”  Dennis G. Jerz.  2007.  Readings: The Critical Path; “Shakespeare’s The Tempest.”

Simon Fraser University.  Canadian Studies CNS 490-5.  “The Canadian Intellectual Tradition.”  Roman Onufrijchuk, 2008.  On “the ideas and writing of three significant contributors to intellectual tradition in Canada: George Grant, Northrop Frye, and Leslie Armour.”

Simon Fraser University.  Communications.  “Myth and Media.”   Roman Onufrijchuk.  2007.  Recommended reading for unit on “MythCrit: Genesis”: Anatomy of Criticism.

Singhania University, India.  English.  “Research Methodology and Approaches to Literature,” M.Phil.  2010–2011.  Reading list for unit 1 includes Anatomy of Criticism.

Sir Wilfred Grenfell College, Memorial University.  English 4105.  “Literary Approaches and Theory.”   Marc Thackray. 2006.  Unit of course devoted to Frye.

Southern Utah State University.  English 2600. “Introduction to Critical Literature and Theory.”  Nozomi Irei.  2010.  Reading for unit on formalism: Archetypes of Literature.

Sri Krishnadevaraya University.  English and Comparative Literature.  2007.  Fourth semester unit on “Critical Theory” requires reading “The Archetypes of Literature”

Stanford University.  English 3055.  “Literary Criticism and Literary Texts: The Anglo‑American Tradition.”  J.M. Evans.  2009.  Readings: “The Archetypes of Literature” and Anatomy of Criticism.

Stanford University.  Interdisciplinary Colloquium in the Humanities.  The theme for 2009–10 is Refractions and Adaptation.  “We will look at the way past cultural forms (canons and various other mythologies) get retreaded, revised, and re-appropriated in a new cultural and social setting. The naive resurfaces as the sentimental (Schiller), tragedy as farce (Marx), trauma as symptom (Freud), histories as mythologies (Roland Barthes), ethnography as Orientalism (Said), archetypes and modes as today’s stories and histories (Northrop Frye and Hayden White). . . .”

Stanford University.  English 170.  “Literary Criticism and Literary Texts: The Anglo‑American Tradition.”  J.M. Evans.  2009.  Required reading: “The Archetypes of Literature.”

Stanford University.  Comparative Literature 121/English 60/160.  “Poems, Poetry, Worlds.”  Roland Greene.  2009.  Readings from Anatomy of Criticism.

Stanford University.  English 166A/266A.  “Introduction to Critical Theory: The Pre‑Modern Tradition.”  J.M. Evans.  2002.  Readings from Anatomy of Criticism.

Stanford University.  English 183F.  “From New Criticism to New Historicism: Critical Method.”  Blair Hoxby.  2009.  Required text: Anatomy of Criticism.

State University of New York, Buffalo.  English 587.  “The Comic Aesthetic.”  Andrew Stott.  2005.  Readings in Frye’s theory of comedy.

State University of New York, Buffalo.  English 648.  “Literary Criticism––Not without Psychoanalysis.”  Steve Miller.  2009.  Includes critical texts by Frye.

State University of New York, Fredonia.  English 345.  “Critical Reading.”  Bruce Simon.  2002.  Reading from The Critical Path for a unit on “Structure and Textuality.”

State University of New York, Fredonia.  English 209.  “Novels and Tales: Powers of Narrative.”  Bruce Simon.  2003.  Reading list includes Anatomy of Criticism.

State University of New York, New Paltz.  English 555.  “Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism.”  2001.  Includes study of Frye’s theories.

St. Aloysius College, Jabalpur, India.  “M.A. in English Literature.”  Unit on Commonwealth Literature includes Anatomy of Criticism.

St. Jerome’s University.  MCT 503.  “Foundations of Theology.”  Cristina Vanin.  2005.  Additional reading for unit on Teresa of Avila: Anatomy of Criticism.

St. Jerome’s University, University of Waterloo.  English 214.  “Themes in Canadian Literature.”  Lindy Ledohowski.  2010.  “Conclusion” to Literary History of Canada is on reading list.

Tainan National College of the Arts, Kuantian, Taiwan.  Graduate Seminar.  “Histories of Aesthetics and the Arts.”  Leo C. Chen.  2004.  Week 17 devoted to The Double Vision.

Tamil Nadu Open University, Guindy, India.  English 22.  “Literary Criticism.”  2nd‑year M.A. course.  Reading: “The Archetypes of Literature.”

Temple University.  English 9001.  “Introduction to Graduate Study.”  Dan O’Hara.  2007.  Required text: Anatomy of Criticism.

Towson University.  English 461 [561].  “History of Literary Criticism.”  2010.  Frye included among the major theorists.

Trent University.  Cultural Studies/English 329.  “Utopian Fiction.”  Veronica Hollinger.  Reading of “Varieties of Literary Utopias.”

Trinity College, Cambridge University.  “Themes and Sources: Utopian Writing, 1516–1798.”  Included in readings for unit on the genre of utopia, “Varieties of Literary Utopias.”

Tusculum College.  Honors 101-10.  “Quest for Meaning.”  Nancy Thomas.  2008.  Required texts: The Educated Imagination.

Universitat Autónoma de Barcelona.  English and Germanic Philology.  “Teatre Anglès del Renaixement.”  Jodi Coral.  2008.  Reading of Northrop Frye on Shakespeare.

Universidad Complutense de Madrid.  English Literature 62I.  “Literatura Anglo-canadiense.”  2005–2006.  Includes unit on the theory of Canadian literature with readings from The Bush Garden.

Universidad de Córdoba.  English Literature 9520015.  “Crítica Literaria Anglonorteamerica.”  Julián Jiménez Heffernan and Paula Martin Salvan.  2009–2010.  Unit 8 on “Formalism and Historicism” includes Frye.

Universidad de Salamanca.  Department of English Studies 14967.  “Literatura Canadiense en Lengua Inglesa.”  Anna María Fraile Marcos.  2009–2010.  Reading list includes The Bush Garden.

Universidad de Salamanca.  Department of English Studies.  “The Rise and Development of the Novel.”  Pedro Javier Pardo.  Reading List includes Anatomy of Criticism.

Universidad of Sevilla.  810031.  “English Literary Criticism 101.”  Miguel Juan Gronow Smith.  2009–2010.  Unit on “System and Archetype” includes reading of “The Archetypes of Literature.”

Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona.  Departament de Filologia Anglesa i de Germanística 28495.  “Teatre Angles del Renaixement.”   Jordi Coral.  2007–2008.  Reading list includes Northrop Frye on Shakespeare.  “It includes a brilliantly written chapter on The Tempest.)

Universitatea de Nord Baia Mare, Romania.  Modern Languages.  “Shakespeare and the Literature of the English Renaissance.”  Ana Olos.  2006.  Readings from The Stubborn Structure.

Universitatea Babeş-Bolyai, Cluj-Napoca, Romania.  Comparative Literature.  “Literary Theory.”  Corin Braga.  2007.  Unit on “Comparative Literature and the Archetype,” reading of the Romanian translation of Anatomy of Criticism.

Universitatea Babeş-Bolyai, Cluj-Napoca, Romania.  “Poezia secolului al XVIII-lea Şi romantismul.”  2009.  Reading list for this unit on Romanticism includes Fearful Symmetry.

University of Aberdeen.  English 2006.  “Reading Shakespeare.”  Thomas Rist.  2007.  Reading of A Natural Perspective and “Charms and Riddles.”

University of Aberdeen.  English 5032.  “Theory of the Novel.”  Catherine Jones.  2009 Week 7, on Romance, requires reading selections from Anatomy of Criticism.

University of Aberdeen.  English 1007.  “Reading Writing.”  2009.  Secondary reading on More’s Utopia recommends “Varieties of Literary Utopias.”

University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa.  “Religious Studies 112.  “Introduction to the New Testament.”  Theodore Louis Trost. 2010.   Recommended text:  The Great Code.

University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa.  Religion 311.  “The English Bible as Literature.”  Theodore Louis Trost.  2006.  Among recommended texts: The Great Code.

University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa.  English 311.  “Special Topics in Literature: William Blake: The Marriage of Poetry & Art.”  S. McWaters.  2010.  Readings: criticism by Frye

University of Amsterdam.  English 8359.  “Vision and Apocalypse in Spenser, Milton, and Blake.”  J.M. de Waard.  2007–2008.  Critical studies alongside the primary texts include Frye.

University of Arizona.  English 596g-2.  “Readings in Epic Poetry.”  John Ulreich.  2007.  Readings from Frye on the epic.

University of Bologna.  English Literature 31031.  “Fairyland and Its People.”  Gino Scatasta.  2009–2010. Readings include chapters on A Midsummer Night’s Dream and The Tempest from the Italian translation of Northrop Frye on Shakespeare.

University of Bologna.  English Literature 22138.  “Shakespeare.”  Gino Scatasta.  2005–2006.  Reading includes the chapter on King Lear from the Italian translation of Northrop Frye on Shakespeare.

University of Bologna.  English Literature 31170.  “Anglo‑American Literature.”  2009–2010.  Reading for unit on Canadian literature includes The Bush Garden.

University of Bologna.  English Literature 43444.  “The Old and New Imagination in Canadian Literature in English.”  Elena Lamberti.  Giuliana Gardellini.  2007–2008.  Readings include Mythologizing Canada. Essays on the Canadian Literary Imagination and The Bush Garden.

University of Bologna.  Foreign Languages and Literature.  “Course in Comparative Literature.”  Remo Ceserani.  2000–2001.   Reading includes the Italian translation of Anatomy of Criticism.

University of British Columbia.  Department of Language and Literacy Education.  LLE 601A.  “Doctoral Seminar in Language and Literacy Education.”  John Willinsky.  2006.  Reading for unit on literary theory includes “The Motive for Metaphor” from The Educated Imagination.

University of Calgary.  Historical Studies 525-L01.  “Topics in Canadian Intellectual History: Technology and Social Reform.  R.D. Francis.  2006.  One of the seminar topics: “Northrop Frye and the Scientific-Technological Myth.”

University of Calgary.  Historical Studies 203-L60.  “The History of Canada.”  Brad Rennie.  2000.  Unit on “Science and Culture: Writers and Painters” includes Frye.

University of California at Berkeley.  Comp Lit. 41E.  “Comedies of Marriage: Shakespeare, Screwball, and Beyond.”  Tristram Wolff.  2010.  Primary and secondary reading on comedy includes selections by Frye.

University of California, Berkeley.  Comp Lit. R1B:13.  “The Voices of Love in Discourse.”  G. Bonetti and J. Weiner.  2010.  Readings include  The Secular Scripture.

University of California, Berkeley.  English 190.  “Research Seminar: Comedy.”  Ian Duncan.  2010. “Discussions will be guided by some of the critics, theorists and philosophers of comedy, notably Stanley Cavell and Northrop Frye.”

University of California, Irvine.  English 101W.  “Character Types.  Jami Bartlett.  2009.  Frye included in course readings.

University of California at Los Angeles.  English.  Frye is on the reading list for the following fields: rhetoric, Romanticism, and literary theory

University of California at Riverside.  English 102.  “Introduction to Critical Methods.”  P. Aaron Potter.  Frye included among the “essential” critics.

University of California, Santa Barbara.   “Archetypes of Literature” is on the qualifying exam Reading List 9: General Theory.

University of California, Santa Cruz.  LTPR 121.  “Ancient Novel: Ancient Menippean Satire and the Roman Novel.”  H. Christian Blood.  2009.  Reading of selections by Frye on satire.

University of Chicago.  German 53500 and English 53500.  “Enlightenment Typologies.”  Jim Chandler and Christiane Frey.  2006.  Reading in modern criticism includes Frye.

University of Connecticut.  English 304-01 (#8683).  “The Bible as Literature.”  Clare Costley King’oo.  2008.  Theoretical readings include Frye.

University of Duisburg-Essen.  Seminar. “Literary Theory.”  Dr. H. Mann. 2002.  Frye included in unit on structuralism.

University of Düsseldorf.  Mastermodul/Hauptseminar.  “Docu-Drama – ‘Only the facts have been changed to protect the Innocent.’”  Ingrid-Charlotte Wolter.  2010.  Includes a study of Frye’s archetypal criticism as applied to docu‑drama and science fiction.

University of Exeter.  English EAS 3086.  “Satire.”  Robert L. Mack.  2007.  Secondary reading: Anatomy of Criticism.

University of Florida.  English 3010.  “Theory and Practice of Modern Criticism.”  Raúl Sánchez.  2007.  A study of Frye’s work, among others.

University of Florida.  English 3010.  “The Theory and Practice of Modern Criticism.”  John Murchek. 2003.  A study of Frye’s work, among others.

University of Florida.  English 4953.  “Visions of Blake.”  Donald Ault.  2007.  Course will “explore ‘Blake’ as a ‘visionary’ and as a ‘cultural myth’ that has been produced through the ways his name and his work have been culturally envisioned and constituted through academic discourse (primarily literary criticism such as Northrop Frye’s Fearful Symmetry) and dimensions of popular consciousness (primarily in films, comics, sculpture, and music).”

University of Florida.  History 6469.  “The Best and Brightest from the History and Philosophy of Science.” Robert A. Hatch .  2005.  Readings: Anatomy of Criticism.

University of Florida.  English 4953.  “Visions of Blake.”  Donald Ault.  2007.  “Explore[s] ‘Blake’ as a ‘visionary’ and as a ‘cultural myth’ that has been produced through the ways his name and his work have been culturally envisioned and constituted through academic discourse (primarily literary criticism such as Northrop Frye’s Fearful Symmetry).”

University of Gauhati, Jalukbari, India.  Postgraduate Course in English.  2009.  Unit on “Critical Theory” requires reading of “The Mythos of Autumn: Tragedy”

University of Georgia.  Spanish 8180.  “La teoría literaria y cultural.”  Dana Bultman.  2004.  Readings:  Theory of Myths from Anatomy of Criticism.

University of Guelph.  English 431.  “Studies in Drama: Canadian Shakespeares.”  Leanore Lieblein.  2005.  Among other topics, “the role of Northrop Frye in the creation of one of our Shakespeares.”  Readings from A Natural Perspective.

University of Hartford, President’s College.  “The Romantics.”  2001.  Recommended reading for unit on Blake: Fearful Symmetry.

University of Helsinki.  “Film and the World’s Perception.”  2005.  Unit on mimesis includes Frye.

University of Hong Kong, School of English.  English 6104.  “Modes.”  2009.  Focuses on the history and adaptation of modes, developed by Frye, as they pertain to strategies for creative writing.

University of Houston.  Literature 4533.  “Tragedy.”  Craig White.  2010.  Unit on narrative genres based on Frye’s mythoi.

University of Kansas.  English 479.  “The Literature of Comedy.”  Richard F. Hardin.  Course based on views of comedy of “ancient writers like Donatus and modern theorists like Northrop Frye.”

University of Kent.  English 877.  “Dickens and Comedy.”  Malcolm Anderson.  2010.  Course pack of readings includes “Dickens and the Comedy of Humours.”

University of Kent.  Religious Studies TH580/596.  “Religion and Story.”  Preliminary reading includes The Great Code.

University of Konstanz.  English and American Literature. 2008.  Reading list for Romantic and Victorian ages includes A Study of English Romanticism.

University of Konstanz.  Seminar.  “Narration Generation Intention.”  Alexandra Kofler.  2007–2008.

Fifth session devoted to “Theory of Modes” from Anatomy of Criticism.

University of London.  “Explorations in Literature 1.”  2009.  Recommended supplementary reading for unit on the Bible: The Great Code.

University of Madras.  English and Foreign Languages C009.  “Literary Criticism and Literary Theory.”  2007–2008.  Required reading: “The Archetypes of Literature.”

University of Manchester.  English 30672.  “Shakespeare: Genre, Text And Performance.”  Jacqueline Pearson.  2010.  Indicative reading includes A Natural Perspective.

University of Manchester.  English 20372.  “Shakespeare: Genre, Text And Performance.”  Crawford Gribben.  2006.  Indicative reading includes A Natural Perspective.

University of Maribor, Slovenia.  Slovenian Language and Literature.  “Introduction to the Essay and Literary Criticism.”  Miran Štuhec.  2006.  One of the textbooks is the Slovenian translation of Anatomy of Criticism.

University of Massachusetts, Amherst.  English 891EE.  “Theatrical Space and Social Relations in Early Modern England.”  Adam Zucker.  2005.  “Reconsider[s] the pastoral space of dramatic comedy––Northrop Frye’s famous ‘green world’––as a historically located site of dramatic and social conflict.”

University of Massachusetts, Amherst.   English 95 3.  “Literary Criticism.”  William H. Pritchard.  Readings from Frye and other “major English and American critics of literature from the last hundred or so years.”

University of Michigan.  English 484.  “Issues in Criticism: Romantic Nature.”  Tobin Siebers.  Readings in  Romanticism Reconsidered.

University of Michigan.  English 413.  Film Genres and Types.   “Comedy and Horror, 1974–1986.”  Robert W. Rayher. Readings in Frye’s theory of comedy.

 

University of Michigan. English 298.  “Introduction to Literary Studies.”  Lucy Hartley.  2010.  Introduction to major works of the twentieth century that have been important in breaking new ground for the study of literature; for example, Eric Auerbach’s Mimesis, Northrop Frye’s Anatomy of Criticism. . . .”

University of Michigan.  Greek 515.  “Euripides.”  Benjamin B. Acosta-Hughes.  2002.  Discussion of the plays begins “with some theoretical framework (particularly Northrop Frye’s Secular Scripture ).”

University of Michigan.  English 403.  “Topics in Language and Rhetorical Studies: Stylistics.”  Richard D. Cureton.  2009.  Required text: Anatomy of Criticism.

University of Minnesota, Twin Cities.  CSCL 1909W 00.  “Freshman Seminar: The Poetics of Narrative in Film and Literature.”  Hisham Bizri.  2005.  Required reading: Anatomy of Criticism.

University of Mississippi.  English 205.  “Critical Approaches to Literature.”  John B. Padgett.  Frye’s work examined in unit on mythological criticism.

University of Missouri, St. Louis.  English 5000.  “Introduction to Graduate Study in English.”  2009.  Required reading: “The Archetypes of Literature.”

University of Missouri, Kansas City.  English 447.  “Introduction To Literary Criticism.”  2007–2008.  First third of the course is a “historical overview of criticism from Aristotle to Northrop Frye.”

University of Montana.  English 376.  “The Bible as Literature.”  Robert Baker.  2009.  Required text: The Great Code.

University of Murcia.  English 03D1.  “Curso monográpfico de poesía.”  Laura Campillo.  2007–2008.  In this course on English Romantic poetry, one of the “basic” texts is A Study of English Romanticism.

University of Murcia.  English 04D9.  “Shakespeare.”  Ángel-Luis Pujante.  2007–2008.  Northrop Frye on Shakespeare is listed among other works as “Bibliografía fundamental.”

University of Nevada, Las Vegas.  English 760.  “Studies in Literary Genres: Satire.”  Anne H. Stevens.  2008.  Reading includes “The Nature of Satire.”

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.  Italian 357.  “Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio.” Dino S. Cervigni.   The Great Code is on the reading list.

University of North Carolina, Greensboro.  English 549.  “The Critical Canon and Contemporary Issues.”   Stephen R. Yarbrough.  2005.  Required reading: “The Archetypes of Literature.”

University of Notre Dame.  English 30101.  “Introduction to Literary Studies.”  Susan Cannon Harris.  2009.  Required reading for unit on archetypes: “The Archetypes of Literature.”

University of Oregon,  English 300.  “Introduction to Literary Criticism.”  James Crosswhite.  2005.  Unit on “Intertextual Criticism” requires reading of The Critical Path.

University of Oslo.  Literature 2342.  “The Novel.”  Leif Høghaug.  2004.  Units on Bunyan and Swift require reading Anatomy of Criticism (“Polemical Introduction,” Second, Third, and Fourth Essays).

University of Oslo.  Department of Literature, Area Studies and European Languages.  English 4371.  “Satire.”  2005.  Reading requirements include selections from Anatomy of Criticism.

University of Ottawa.  English 6310.  “Medieval Epic, Middle Ages as Epic.”  Geoff Rector.  2011.  Includes reading of “Theory of Genres” from Anatomy of Criticism.

University of Paderborn.  “Rezeptionsgeschichte der Bibel.”  Martin Leutzsch.  Winter semester 2008–2009.  Materials for Leutzsch’s lectures on “Literary Texts” include The Great Code.

University of Paris.  41O3LBA5.  “British Poetry: The Poetry of Crises.”  Jean-Marie Fournier.  2009.  Reading includes Fearful Symmetry.

University of Paris, Sorbonne.  French Literature.  “Research Methodology.”   M. Louette.  2009–2010.  Texts include the French translation of The Secular Scripture.

University of Pennsylvania, School of Arts and Sciences.  Russian 426601.  “Chekhov on Stage and Screen.”  Vera Zubarev. 2007.  Readings from  Anatomy of Criticism.

University of Pennsylvania.  Comparative Literature 360.401.  “Introduction to Literary Theory.”  Jean‑Michel Rabaté.  Readings from Frye.

University of Pennsylvania.  Comparative Literature SM 622. (English 774).  “Postmodernism.”  Includes readings in Frye’s theory of the novel.

University of Pennsylvania.  English 102.  “Introduction to Drama.”  Zachary Lesser.  2010.  Required readings include “The Argument of Comedy.”

University of Prince Edward Island.  English 306.  “Critical Approaches to Texts.”  Geoffrey Lindsay.  2008.  Frye included among the theorists to be discussed.

University of Pune, India.  M.A. in English/15.  “Contemporary Critical Theory.”  2002.  Readings include “The Archetypes of Literature.”

University of Pune, India.  M.A. in English/24.  “Literary Theory and Criticism.”  2002.  Readings include “Criticism: Visible and Invisible.”

University of Pune, India.  M.A. in English/69.  “Tragedy.”  2002.  Readings include Fools of Time.

University of Rajasthan, Jaipur, India.  B.A. Honors.  “Elizabethan Age and Metaphysicals.”  One of the required papers is based on Fools of Time.

University of Rajasthan, Jaipur, India.  English.  M.A. Examination.  Unit on Canadian literature: reading of The Bush Garden.

University of Rajasthan, Jaipur, India.  English.  M.Phil. examination.  Required reading for unit on “Twentieth‑Century Literary Criticism”: “The Drunken Boat.”

University of Regina.  480AE/817AE.  “Frye: The Secret of Literature.”  Garry Sherbert.  “For Northrop Frye, myth and metaphor constitute the social function of literature by suspending reference. Frye’s claim will be compared to Jacques Derrida’s proposition that suspending reference (the secret) is analogous to the mysteries of the Bible, and indispensable to the political survival of democracy.”

University of Rochester.  English 551.  “The Sacralization and Desacralization of Texts.”  David Bleich.  2007.  On the sacralization of texts by Frye and others versus the view of texts as secular and vernacular.

University of Saskatchewan.  English 277.3.  “Literary Uses of Mythology.”  S. Powrie.  2009–2020.  “An introduction to myth, biblical stories, and Northrop Frye’s literary criticism.”

University of Siena, Scuola di Dottorato in “L’Interpretazione”––Sezione di “Letteratura Comparata e Traduzione del Testo Letterario.” Lecture by Alex Falzon Roger on “The Anatomy of Criticism by Northrop Frye.”  2006

University of Silesia, Institute of Culture and English Language Literatures.  “Canadian Literature.”  Date uncertain but after 2003.  Reading includes “Conclusion to the Literary History of Canada.”

University of South Florida, Sarasota‑Manatee.  English 4013.  “Literary Criticism.”  Susan Harrington.  2009.  Weeks 7 and 8 devoted to Frye’s theory of modes and “The Archetypes of Literature.”

University of Southern Illinois.  English 121.  “The Western Literary Tradition.”  Roy Bearden‑White.  In connection with unit on Don Quixote, reading of “The Archetypes of Literature.”

University of Strathclyde.  English ES203.  “Introduction to Literary Study.”  Sarah Edwards.  2010.  Reading of “The Archetypes of Literature.”

University of Stockholm.  “Intermediate Course in the History of Literature.”  2007.  Reading list for unit on myth and archetype includes Anatomy of Criticism.

University of Sussex.  Literature, Religion and Philosophy.  “The Bible and Literature.”  Norman Vance.  2009.  Recommended reading: The Great Code.

University of Sussex.  English Q3016.  “Period of English 1740-1830.”  Norman Vance.  2010.  Fearful Symmetry on reading list for unit on Blake.

University of Sussex.  English and Drama Q3059.  “Staging the Renaissance: Shakespeare.”  Margaret Healy.  2009.  Recommended reading: “The Argument of Comedy.”

University of Sussex.  Early Modern Literature and Culture.  “All’s Well that Ends Well: Comedy and Laughter in Early Modern Europe.”  Adriana Bontea.  2009.  Reading for the unit on “The Happy Ending of Comedy”: The Myth of Deliverance.

University of Tampere, Finland.  “Advanced Theory of Literature.”  Yrjö Hosiaisluoma.  2003–2004.  Unit on research into myths and symbols includes Anatomy of Criticism.

University of Tasmania.  HEA413.  “Time and Narrative.”  N. Shaw and K. Atkins.  2005.  Examines the narrative theories in Anatomy of Criticism and in Paul Ricoeur’s Time and Narrative.

University of Texas at Arlington.  English 2350.  “Introduction to Textual Analysis and Interpretation.”  Bridgitte A. Barclay. 2005.   Unit on structuralism partially devoted to “The Archetypes of Literature.”

University of Texas, Arlington.  English 2350.  “Criticism & Theory.”  Luanne Frank.  2010.  Unit on “The Psychoanalytic Tradition” includes reading of Frye.

University of Texas at Arlington.  ENG 5360.  “Topics in Contemporary Critical Theory Twentieth-Century Literary History: Major Texts.”  Hans Kellner.  An examination of “the works of Georg Lukacs, Northrop Frye, Erich Auerbach, and Fredric Jameson.”

University of Texas, Austin.  Comparative Literature 390.  “Twentieth-Century (Western) Theory.”  Katherine Arens.  Readings from Anatomy of Criticism and The Critical Path.

University of Texas, Austin.  Greek 383/ Latin.  “Greek and Roman New Comedy.”  Timothy Moore.  2006. Readings from Anatomy of Criticism.

University of Texas, Austin.  Classics TC 302 (43710).  “Comedy, Ancient and Modern.”  Timothy Moore.  2009.  Readings from Anatomy of Criticism.

University of Texas, Austin.   Classics 390.  “Introduction to Twentieth-Century (Western) Theory.”  Katherine Arens.  2008.  Required reading: selections from Anatomy of Criticism and “The Critical Path.”

University of Texas, Dallas.  English 478S.  “Critical Theory Since Plato.”  Ming Dong Gu.  Year uncertain but after 2001.  Required reading for the unit on “Psychoanalytic Theory”: “The Archetypes of Literature.

University of Texas, San Antonio.  “The Archetypes of Literature” is included on the M.A. reading list for 2009–2010.

University of the Fraser Valley.  English 366.  “Studies in Critical Approaches to Literature.”  Miriam Nichols.  2009.  Readings include selections from Anatomy of Criticism.

University of the West Indies.  LITS2307.  “Modern Critical Theory.”  Richard L.W. Clarke.  2005.  Reading for unit on “Archetypal Criticism” includes “The Archetypes of Literature.”

University of Toronto.  English 5272HS.  ‘Tragedy and Melodrama in the Cold War.”  Alan Ackerman.  2009–2010.  Required reading includes essays by Frye.

University of Toronto, Faculty of Information Studies, McLuhan Program in Culture and Technology.  Twyla Gibson.  2008.   C&T 1003H.  “Comparative Orality and Literacy.”  Week 2 looks “at Frye’s discussion concerning Plato’s contribution to the evolution of both language and genres, and deals with his typology for comparing Greek oral-derived literature with the Bible, as well as myths and literature from different traditions.”

University of Toronto.   English 4669HS.  “Nineteenth‑Century Romance.”  Christine Bolus Reichert.  2009–2010.  Secondary readings by Frye, among others.

University of Toronto, Scarborough.  English GD03S.  “Topics in Contemporary Literary Theory.”

Melba Cuddy‑Keane.  2003.  Reading list includes The Educated Imagination.

University of Toronto, Scarborough.  English GB42H3.  “The Bible and Literature I.”  2004.  Reading of selections from Frye and other commentators on myth.

University of Toronto, Scarborough.  English GB07Y.  “Canadian Literature in English: An Introduction.”  Includes the study of Frye’s work.

University of Toulouse.  Comparative Literature.  “The Mystics and Literary Writing.”  M. Bonfils.  2009.  Reading of The Great Code.

University of Turku, Finland.  “Introduction to Media Studies.”  Seija Ridell.  2003.  Unit on the genres of literature includes Anatomy of Criticism.

University of Utah.  English 3600–01.  “Ways of Reading: Introduction to the Methods of Literary Study.” Scott Black.  2009.  Required text: The Educated Imagination.

University of Utah.  Film 3320.  “History of Film: 1950s to the Present.”  William Siska.  2009.  Required reading: “The Argument of Comedy.”

University of Vermont.  English 135.  “Shakespeare.”  Lisa Schnell.  2005.  Assigned reading: “The Argument of Comedy.”

University of Victoria, British Columbia.  English 360.  “Shakespeare’s Theater of Envy.”  Richard van Ort.  2009.  Examines the “precursors” to René Girard in the twentieth century’s rich tradition of anthropological Shakespeare criticism, including Frye.

University of Victoria, British Columbia.  English 457.  “Literary and Cultural Criticism in Canada.”  2010–2011.  Frye included in list of critics to be studied.

University of Washington.  Comparative Literature 250.  “Introduction to Comparative Literature: Literature and Culture.”  Henry J. Staten.  2010.  Readings of literary texts will be organized around Frye’s theory of modes in Anatomy of Criticism, Auerbach’s reading of Chretien in Mimesis, Watt’s account of the origins of realism, and Jameson’s theory of genre as mediation between the individual text and history.

University of Washington.  Comparative Literature 509.  “History of Literary Criticism and Theory III.”  Literary criticism and theory from Kant’s Critique of Judgment to the mid-twentieth century and the work of Frye.  Offered: jointly with English 509.

University of Washington.  English 200D.  “Utopian Islands.”  Andy Meyer.  2009.  Required reading: “Varieties of Literary Utopias.”

University of Washington.  English 111a.  “Composing Meaning.”  Lee Michael Einhorn.  2009.  Week 2 required reading: “How True a Twain.”

University of Washington.  Religion 570.  “Religion and Literature.”  Eugene Webb.  2010.  Reading of The Great Code.

University of Washington.  English 494:  “Honors Seminar: What We Talk about When We Talk about Genre.”  Charles P. Laporte.  2007.  Study of the genre theories of Frye and others.

University of Washington.  Spanish 321.  “Introduction to Hispanic Literary Studies.”  George Shipley.  2000.  Required text: The Educated Imagination.

University of Washington.  English 363A.  “Literature and Other Arts (How Humans Create Space and Time with Words and Images.”  Petia Parpoulova.  2010.  A course reader includes theoretical texts by Frye.

University of Washington.  English 498B.  “Senior Seminar: Shakespearean Comedy.”  William Streitberger.  2009.  Required text: A Natural Perspective.

University of Washington.  English 242.  “Introduction to Reading Fiction: Myths, Histories & Fictions.”  Daniel Griesbach.  2007.  Required reading: “Theory of Myths” from Anatomy of Criticism.

University of Waterloo.  English 103B.  “Varieties of English.”  Andrew McMurry.  2001.  Unspecified readings from Frye.

University of Waterloo.  English 700.  “Theory and Criticism.”  Andrew McMurry.  2009.  Reading of “The Archetypes of Literature.”

University of West Georgia.  English 1101.  “Composition I.”  Patricia Burgey.  2005.  Reading of “The Three Languages”  from The Educated Imagination.

University of West Georgia.  English 2300.04.  “Practical Criticism.”  John Micheal Crafton.  2009.  Frye included in unit on psychoanalytic criticism.

University of West Georgia.  English 4310.  “Studies in Literary Theory: History and Structure, Canoning and Un-canoning.”  John Micheal Crafton.  2005.   Frye included in unit on “Structuralism, Semiotics, and Myth.”

University of Western Ontario.  CLC/German/Spanish 2205F.  “Literary Theory.”  Călin Mihăilescu,  2010.  Reading of “Sequence and Mode” and “Concern and Myth” from Words with Power.

University of Western Ontario.  English 204F.  “Studies in Poetics.”   S.J. Adams.  2007.  Required reading: “The Archetypes of Literature.”

University of Western Ontario.  Comparative Literature/English 533A.  “The Bible and Contemporary Theory.”  Angela Esterhammer.  2002.  Required reading: selections from The Great Code.

University of Western Ontario, King’s University College.  English 2200F.  “History of Theory and Criticism.”  Ian Rae.  2009.  Required reading: “The Archetypes of Literature.”

University of Western Ontario.  Modern Languages and Literatures.  CLC2293f.  “The Work of Art and Its Texts.”  Alena Robin.  2009.  Reading list includes Biblical and Classical Myths.

University of Windsor.  English 26-560.  “Literature of Canada.  Karl Jirgens.  2010.  Includes secondary readings from Frye.

University of Wisconsin, Madison.  Hebrew 343.  “Israeli Fiction in Translation.”  Miri Talmon-Bohm. 2008.  Includes lecture by Peter Gentry on The Great Code.

University of Wisconsin, Madison.  Hebrew 301.  “Introduction to Modern Hebrew Literature.”  Miri Talmon-Bohm. 2008.  Includes lecture by Peter Gentry on The Great Code.

University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee.  English 458–001.  “Writers in English Literature, 1798-1900: William Blake.”  William Van Pelt.  2004.  Required reading includes “Blake’s Treatment of the Archetype.”

University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee.  2005.  Reading list for M.A. in Comparative Literature includes Anatomy of Criticism.

University of Würzburg.  Seminar.  “The Great Code: The Bible as/and Literature.”  Ralph Pordzik.  2009–2010.  “The focus of this seminar is on the role the Bible has played in the shaping of themes and motifs in English literature since the late sixteenth century.  Proceeding on the basis of Northrop Frye’s seminal study The Great Code, discussion will engage the rewriting and the reinterpretation of ancient narratives in order to bring out the tensions inherent in orthodox scriptural systems and in the responses of English writers commenting on them.”

University of Wyoming.  English 4220.  “English Literature of the 18th Century: Mid to Late-Century.”  Bruce Richardson.  2009.  Reading of “Blake’s Treatment of the Archetype.”

University of Zagreb, Croatia.  Faculty of Philosophy.  “The Teaching of Literature.”   Dean Slavic.  Reading of Anatomy of Criticism.

University of Zagreb, Croatia.  Department of Theory of Literature.  “Reading Literary Texts.”  Croatian translation of Anatomy of Criticism is on the reading list.

University of Zaragoza.  Textual and Cultural Studies in English.  “Intertextuality and the Construction of the Self in the Novels of Jeanette Winterson.”  Susana Onega Jaén and Jesús Martínez Alfaro.”  2006.

Ursinus College.  English 240.  “Shakespeare.”  Matt Kozusko.  2009.  Required reading: “The Argument of Comedy.”

Ursinus College.  English 104.  “Shakespeare and the Movies.”  Matt Kozusko.  2009.  Reading of Frye (unspecified text[s]).

Vanderbilt University.  English 350.  “Narrative Theory/Novel Theory.”  Jay Clayton.  2009.  Readings: selections from The Secular Scripture.

Victoria University, University of Toronto.  Vic One 170Y.  “An Introduction to the Rhetoric of Science, Probability and Persuasion.”  Andrew Baines and Paul Corey.  2009–10.  Required reading:  The Educated Imagination.

Viterbo University.  English 486-001.  “Mythmakers.”  2010.  Includes study of Frye’s ideas about myth.

Walla Walla University.  English 466.  “Literary and Critical Theory.”  2004.  Required reading: “The Archetypes of Literature.”

Wayne State University.  2008.  Anatomy of Criticism is on the recommended reading list for the M.A. in Theatre.

Wesleyan University.  English 303.  “Narrative Theory.”  Matthew Garrett.  2009.  Portion of week 5 devoted to Anatomy of Criticism.

West Chester University.  Literature 165: “Imaginary Worlds: Topics in Literature.”  Stacy Tartar Esch.   2005.  Readings include selections from Frye.

Westmont College.  NS582.  “Biblical Narrative: Issues and Approaches.”  Bruce N. Fisk.  Required reading: The Great Code.

Wilfrid Laurier University.  English 430a.  “Studies of an Individual Author: Northrop Frye and the Anatomy of Criticism.”  Ed Jewinski.  2004.

William Jessup University.  English 330.  “The Bible and Literature.”  Alice Mills.  2010.  Required texts: The Great Code.

Williams College.  English 224(S)/Theatre 316.  “Tragedy and Dramatic Theory.”  Linda Buntzen.  2000.  Readings of Frye on the constitutive elements of tragedy.

Wingate University.  English 430.  “Literary Theory .”  John Sykes. 2009.  Anatomy of Criticism included among books for seminar presentation by students.

Yale University.  Comparative Literature 587b (Russian 747b).  “Comparative Study of Lyric.”  John MacKay.  2006.  Reading of criticism by Frye.

Yale University, School of Drama.  Drama 256a.  “What’s So Funny: Comic Theory and Practice.”  2008.  Includes readings of Frye’s works.

Yale University, School of Drama.  Drama 256b.  “The Political Shakespeare.”  2008.  Examines criticism by Frye.

Yale University.  Humanities S215 / Literature S173.  “The Utopian Impulse in Early Modern Literature and Society.”  Mia Reinoso Genoni.  2009.  Reading” “Varieties of Literary Utopias.”

Yeshiva College of Yeshiva University.  English 1932H.  “Humor and Satire in American Culture: From The Spectator to Jon Stewart.”  T. Thompson.  2008.  Readings by Frye on satire.

York University.  English 4004.  “Two Canadian Theorists: Northrop Frye and Marshall McLuhan.”  Bruce W. Powe.  2010.  Readings: The Educated Imagination), The Great Code, and The Double Vision.

York University.  Humanities 2680 9.0A.  2010.  “Early Times: The Imagination of the Child.”  Readings include The Educated Imagination.

York University.  Humanities 2699. “Contexts for the Study of the Humanities.” Douglas Freake.  2009.  Readings include The Educated Imagination.

York University.  English AP/EN 1001.  “An Introduction to Literary Study.”  Bruce W. Powe.  2010.  Reading list includes The Educated Imagination.

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One Response to “Frye in Our Colleges and Universities Today (2010)”

  1. Jonathan Allan Says:

    Well, the sad news running around many students and faculty at U of T is that Frye’s legacy has just sustained another serious blow with the all-but-certain closure of the Centre for Comparative Literature.

    This list, however, is reassuring and also important because it reminds graduate students like me that “yes, there are people who care about research on Frye.”

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